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Biology, Botany and Zoology

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http://www.livescience.com/

There seems to be no end to the odd creatures that scientists find by digging up fossils. Here we celebrate some of the coolest extinct fish, mammals, dinosaurs, birds and other beasts.

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Wonders-World.com

Bacteria are ubiquitous, present in the soil, air and water around you. Some bacteria can be beneficial, while other bacteria causes illness and even death. Pathogenic bacteria, those organisms that cause disease, relentlessly bombard your body daily

News Link • Global Reported By Pavle Glumerys
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LiveScience

Plants living inside an animal? Yep, that's what scientists found when peering inside a spotted salamander: live green algae. While the two species may seem like strange bedfellows, their intimate, one-of-a-kind relationship is helpful for both.

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LiveScience

A carnivorous plant that lives in bogs worldwide traps its prey in less than a millisecond, more than 100 times faster than a Venus flytrap can manage. Utricularia, a genus of rootless carnivorous plants, is better known by its common name, bladderwo

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Reuters

A new species of giant crayfish literally crawled out from under a rock in Tennessee, proving that large new species of animals can be found in highly populated and well-explored places, researchers said on Wednesday. The new crayfish should not h

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LiveScience

It's a tale that has all the trappings of a cult 1960s sci-fi movie: Scientists bring back ancient salt crystals, dug up from deep below Death Valley for climate research. The sparkling crystals are carefully packed away until, years later, a young,

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Terrence Aym

Soon scars may be a thing of the past. Scars have been the bane of humans throughout history. Scar tissue can be an embarrassment, disfiguring, even life-threatening. Now an amazingly simple solution seems to have been discovered. The answer lies wit

News Link • Global Reported By Terrence Aym
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AFP

Japanese scientists said Tuesday they had produced a mouse that tweets like a bird in a genetically engineered "evolution" which they hope will shed light on the origins of human language. A team of researchers at the University of Osaka created t

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Terrence Aym

"Man-made life." -- To some it conjures up scenes from "Blade Runner"—junk strewn laboratories with mad Japanese scientists hunched in the cellars of Los Angeles modifying patented cellular life complete with bar code identifiers for a price. Oth

News Link • Global Reported By Terrence Aym
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LiveScience

Imagine some buckshot from a shotgun got stuck in you or you had a radio transmitter stuck in you. If you were a frog, your body apparently have the remarkable ability to pee out foreign objects, with their bladders engulfing the intrusions to get ri

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LiveScience

Flytrap leaves close so quickly - in under a second - because they snap from convex to concave the same way that a contact lens can flip inside out. Venus flytrap's chemical signals work much like those in the human brain. Like neurotransmitters, the

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Terrence Aym

For more than a century, serious investigators have searched for the fabled man-eating plants. Those horrors of the darkest jungles that supposedly hide in the most forbidding corners of the world's most inaccessible green hells. The origin of the b

News Link • Global Reported By Terrence Aym
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Discovery News

Animals have been on Earth for at least 650 million years, suggest recently found primitive sponge fossils from South Australia. This discovery pushes back the fossil record for animals by about 70 million years, according to a new study

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Gainesville Times

A zedonk, an unusual cross between a donkey and a zebra, is attracting attention at a Wildlife Preserve after being born there a week ago. The animal has a zebra father and donkey mother, has black stripes prominently displayed on her legs and face.

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Biologist Sheila Patek - TED Talks

Biologist Sheila Patek talks about her work measuring the feeding strike of the mantis shrimp, one of the fastest movements in the animal world, using video cameras recording at 20,000 frames per second.

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