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IPFS News Link • WAR: About that War

"Deconstructing the Obvious" – From My Lai to Nord Stream

• By Seymour M. Hersh, Ray McGovern, and Michael Wel

"The politics of the destruction of the gas-line – whether it's an act of war or what – but it was a slap in the face of Europe, saying, you know, "if you're not going to play ball with me in Ukraine," said the president… "I don't care if it's going to be harder for you to keep your people wealthy and warm." Basically, that's what he's done. And that's the real input of the story."

– Seymour Hersh, from this week's interview

When politicians right across the political spectrum, in support of NATO's role in supplying military support for Ukraine, when major media support this position with extremely one-sided, context-free coverage, and when recent demonstrations in support of peace pale in comparison with the "Stand With Ukraine" rallies, people with a dissenting opinion can feel extremely lonely.

Early in the Vietnam War, people could totally relate. When the war was in its first year, one tenth of Americans said they felt the need to organize a protest and of those individuals one in ten said they would protest the Vietnam War. One in six by contrast said they were more inclined to protest the antiwar demonstrators! [1]

But it was actual journalism doing incisive work that arguably helped turn the tide and contributed to the Vietnam War finally coming to an end. One of many critical pieces of work in this regard was the reporting of a cover-up of the My Lai massacre, in which as many as 500 civilians in South Vietnam were murdered by several members of the 11th Infantry Brigade. The deaths included women and children and infants.[2]

This story helped massively shift attitudes about the promise of a military effort bravely "freeing the people from communism." Despite bipartisan support, the U.S. was defeated in large part by massive domestic popular opposition.[3]


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