Contents Pages by Subject

Military

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AP

The U.S. Army recruited more than 2,600 soldiers under new lower aptitude standards this year, helping the service beat its goal of 80,000 recruits in the throes of an unpopular war and mounting casualties.

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Barbados Free Press

The 2003 decision by the US to cease providing military aid to Barbados and other Caribbean area nations who refused to sign agreements exempting US troops from prosecution under the International Criminal Court ended up being

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Denver Post

A new US push for greater Russian military openness collided with Cold War habits last week as Russian long-range bombers flew within 15 miles of US airspace off Alaska. Fully-armed US fighter jets responded, intercepting the 2 bombers.

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Globe and Mail

The US Coast Guard have started to patrol the Great Lakes with machine guns mounted on their vessels and are conducting live-ammo training drills on the US side to prepare officers to combat terrorists flooding across the border from Canada by boat.

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by Jim Lobe (AntiWar.com)

The news of Schoomaker's [budget demands], which is almost certain to intensify the growing debate over what to do in Iraq, comes just days after reports the Army is considering activating substantially more National Guard troops or reservists.

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LA Times

The Army's top officer withheld a required 2008 budget plan from Pentagon leaders last month after protesting to Defense Secretary Rumsfeld that the service could not maintain its current level of activity in Iraq plus its other global commitment

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NY Times

When they were called up for military service in the wake of 9/11, hundreds of uniformed city workers in the Reserves faced the suspension of their city health and pension benefits. The city offered them an option: it would keep paying their salaries

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AP

The military is toughening a new jailhouse for suspected al-Qaida and Taliban militants to protect guards after a spate of attacks and evidence that detainees have organized themselves into groups to mount uprisings, officials said.

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AP

A federal judge ordered the Department of Defense to release documents containing the identities of some detainees at the U.S. prison camp in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who were released or who suffered mistreatment by their handlers or other detainees.

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AP

The government used prewar data to estimate the cost of caring for veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan, which contributed to a $3 billion budget shortfall at the Veterans Affairs Department since 2005, congressional investigators say.

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Huffington Post

The Wynne story came and went so quickly that radio journalist Charles Goyette from KFNX in Phoenix tried to follow up. An interview was scheduled with the Air Force Secretary's spokesman, USAF Major Aaron Burgstein, to get elaboration on the Sec

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Washington Times (kudos Steve A.)

The Pentagon's top special operations policy-maker is quitting in a move that several Bush administration sources say is the first negative fallout from a major reorganization of advisers in the office of Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld.

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NY Times

Col. Mike Bumgarner took over as the warden of Guantánamo Bay in April 2005. He had been hoping to be sent to Iraq; the job of commanding guards at the American detention camp in Cuba was considered not particularly challenging and somewhat risky to

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AP

There is no such thing as Gulf War syndrome, even though U.S. and foreign veterans of the war report more symptoms of illness than do soldiers who didn't serve there, a federally funded study concludes. U.S. and foreign veterans of the Gulf War

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AP

The widow of a soldier killed in Afghanistan won state approval to place a Wiccan religious symbol on his memorial plaque, something Veterans Affairs had refused. The VA allows only approved emblems of religion on government headstones.

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Consumer Affairs

If microchip maker VeriChip has its way, the armed forces will soon be trading in their dogtags for radio-frequency identifier (RFID) microchips, implanted under the skin and containing all of their medical and personal information.

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www.grouchymedia.com

Large accumulation of War Images to music from all over the Internet. Very Interesting and often informative.

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McClatchy News

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) said that he's confident the Senate will reject President Bush's plan to try accused terrorists without letting them see classified evidence against them. Graham, a military lawyer who's a colonel in the Air For

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AntiWar.com

Last week, a 41-year-old U.S. Army sergeant from Hinesville, Ga., was released from prison after serving 13 months of a 15-month sentence for refusing to board a plane bound for Iraq.

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