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sonoranalliance.com

Sometimes what the legislature does leaves me scratching my head. This time, Senator Russell Pearce, self-proclaimed anti-photo-radar, conservative Senator from Mesa has worked hard on passing this real headscratcher. SB1018, ?Photo Enforcement

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  Imagine you are driving to your desired destination and all of a sudden you see lights flashing in your rear view mirror. Being a good citizen you instinctively look for a good place to pull over. You are ready for the approaching officer with your registration and driver license in hand. Presenting the “officer” with your credentials he asks you if you know why you were pulled over. Again, being a good citizen you answer to the best of your ability. Then things take a turn for the worse. You feel a sinking feeling as the officer asks you to step out of the vehicle.

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Marc J. Victor

Being pulled over by a police officer can be a stressful experience. Although life is full of such experiences, unlike many other stressful experiences, a traffic stop has the potential to end in a loss of money, liberty or even life. No two traffic stops are entirely identical. Therefore, the advisable course of conduct will vary depending on thesituation. However, there are some general rules which can be helpful in many situations.The best piece of advice one can offer is to avoid being pulled over in the first place. A traffic stop offers nothing to be gained. The best case scenario for the driver is to leave as if the stop never occurred losing only some time.   On the other hand, the downside can be disastrous. Vehicle equipment violations such as expired tags or an unlit taillight equate to a neon sign on your car inviting a police officer to pull you over. Remember, a police officer can legally justify a traffic stop based on an equipment violation even if

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Washington Examiner

Area drivers looking to outwit police speed traps and traffic cameras are using an iPhone application and other global positioning system devices that pinpoint the location of the cameras.

That has irked D.C. police chief Cathy Lanier, who promised her officers would pick up their game to   counteract the devices, which can also help drivers dodge sobriety checkpoints. 

"I think that's the whole point of this program," she told The Examiner. "It's designed to circumvent law enforcement -- law enforcement that is designed specifically to save lives."

The new technology streams to iPhones and global positioning system devices, sounding off an alarm as drivers approach speed or red-light cameras.

Lanier said the technology is a "cowardly tactic" and "people who overly rely on those and break the law anyway are going to get caught" in one way or another.

The greater D.C. area