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Geology

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arclein

GAA works by scanning mineral samples - typically weighing around half a kilogram - using high-energy x-rays similar to those used to treat patients in hospitals. The x-rays activate any gold in the sample, and the activation is then picked up using

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arclein

Scientists have traced the geochemical signature of the BB-sized spherules that rained down back to their source, the 1.5-billion-year-old Quebecia terrane in northeastern Canada near the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. At the time of the impact, the region

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arclein

Before the deadly 1963 eruption of Irazú volcano in Costa Rica, magma surged 22 miles (35 kilometers) in about two months, traveling from the mantle to the volcano's shallow magma chamber, researchers report in the Aug. 1 issue of the journal Nature

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arclein

The latest clues in the prehistoric puzzle, which reinforce the volcanism theory, come from Ellesmere Island and nearby Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian Arctic, where five researchers from the University of Calgary and the Geological Survey of Can

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abcnews.go.com

Scientists say lava flow and ash and gas emissions have intensified at a second Ecuadorean volcano, Reventador, as the full-bore eruption of the Tungurahua cone continues.

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earthtechling.com

The link between geothermal power production and earthquakes is one long since established, but new research is providing fresh insight into how Earth responds to this and other sorts of poking around underground that we do.

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arclein

One rare-earth, erbium, acts as a natural amplifier so it is used in fibre-optic cables to boost signals. Terbium generates a change in an electrical circuit when the metal is compressed. That is why it is often found in earthquake monitoring devices

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arclein

Researchers as far back as Charles Darwin have noticed that volcanoes sometimes blow their top after earthquakes. And colossal earthquakes, such as the magnitude-9.0 2011 Japan earthquake and the magnitude-8.8 2010 Chile temblor, can trigger small tr

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arclein

An enduring geological mystery, though, is how the ocean-swallowing subduction zones form in the first place. Oceanic crust cools and becomes more dense as it ages, so older crust may spontaneously buckle, sink into the mantle and form a subduction z

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arclein

If rocks contain jade, the scientists can be fairly sure those rocks are a vestige of an ocean buried underground. Rubies, on the other hand, appear in places where mountains formed from continental collisions, even if those mountains were eroded awa

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arclein

The scientists found that during the Hadean and Archean eons – the first of the four principal eons of the Earth's earliest history – the heavy bombardment of meteorites provided reactive phosphorus that when released in water could be incorporated

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nationalgeographic.com

While many graduate students spend days in a lab or in front of a computer, Roger Putnam, a master's candidate at the University of North Carolina, spent up to three days at a time on the sheer face of a cliff, suspended thousands of feet above ....

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arclein

The three different formations of South Pacific coral-reef islands have long fascinated geologists. Tahiti’s coral forms a “fringing” reef, a shelf growing close to the island’s shore. The “barrier” reefs of Bora Bora are separated from the main isla

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LiveScience

A pocket of water some 2.6 billion years old — the most ancient pocket of water known by far, older even than the dawn of multicellular life — has now been discovered in a mine 2 miles below the Earth's surface.

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arclein

The magma chamber seen in the new study fed these smaller eruptions and is the source of the park's amazing hydrothermal springs and geysers. It also creates the surface uplift seen in the park, said Bob Smith, a seismologist at the University of Ut

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arclein

These experiments pegged the melting point of iron at 4,800 C (about 8,700 F) at a pressure of 2.2 million times that is found on Earth's surface at sea level. Extrapolating from that measurement, scientists estimated the boundary between Earth'

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