Contents Pages by Subject

Anthropology

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NY Times

In a mountainous kingdom in what is now southeastern Turkey, there lived in the eighth century B.C. a royal official, Kuttamuwa, who oversaw the completion of an inscribed stone monument, or stele, to be erected upon his death. The words instructed m

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LiveScience

A grave with the remains of a mother and father huddled together with 2 sons dated to 4,600 years ago and marks the oldest genetic evidence for a nuclear family. The individuals were carefully arranged in their graves to denote they were part of a bi

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AP

A luxurious gold, pearl and emerald earring provides a new visual clue about the life of the elite in Jerusalem some 2,000 years ago. It dates to the Roman period just after the time of Jesus, said Doron Ben-Ami, who directed the dig.

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LiveScience

When early humans mastered the use of fire, their immediate rewards were warmth, light, and protection from nocturnal predators. Investigators have assumed that our ancestors also quickly realized the advantages of flame-cooked food

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LiveScience

Some people point to 1906 as the year of the Great San Francisco Earthquake, but, for anthropologists who study American Indians, it is the year that split the Hopi community of Orayvi, the longest continually occupied settlement in North America.

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news.BBC.co.uk

About 470 coins were found on 1 April at an early Iron Age burial site. They date from the 7th to 9th Century, when Viking traders travelled widely. Most of the coins were minted in Baghdad and Damascus....

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Reuters

A gold necklace found near Lake Titicaca in Peru dates back 4,000 years and is the oldest gold artifact found in the Americas, researchers said. Discovered the necklace next to an adult skull in a burial pit at a hamlet settled by hunter-gatherers fr

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LiveScience

Our gift of the gab is all due to a small horseshoe-shaped bone suspended in the muscles of our neck, like a piece of fruit trapped in Jell-O. The hyoid bone, is the only bone not connected to any other, is found only in humans and Neanderthals.

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AFP/Yahoo News

CAIRO (AFP) - A team of US archaeologists has discovered the ruins of a city dating back to the period of the first farmers 7,000 years ago in Egypt's Fayyum oasis, the supreme council of antiquities said on Tuesday.

News Link • Global Reported By Geoffrey Hayes
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AP

A time capsule was found atop a bell tower at Mexico City's Metropolitan Cathedral, where it was placed in 1791 to protect the building from harm. The lead box — filled with religious artifacts, coins and parchments — was hidden in a hollow stone

TELEGRAPH.co.uk--Malcomb Moore--

The cave, known as the Lupercale, was discovered facing the Circus Maximus underneath the palace of the first emperor, Augustus.

News Link • Global Reported By Geoffrey Hayes
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Reuters

Italian archaeologists believe they have found the cave where, according to legend, a she-wolf nursed Romulus and Remus, the twin founders of Rome. An underground cavity decorated with seashells, colored marble mosaics and pumice stones was discovere

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National Geographic News

Bodies, structures, and rock art thought to belong to an indigenous pre-Columbian culture have been unearthed at an ancient settlement in Puerto Rico, officials recently announced

News Link • Global Reported By Geoffrey Hayes
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Reuters

The chocolate enjoyed around the world today had its origins at least 3,100 years ago in Central America not as the sweet treat people now crave but as a celebratory beer-like beverage and status symbol. Researchers identified residue of a chemical c

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Reuters

If the figurines found in an ancient European settlement are any guide, women have been dressing to impress for at least 7,500 years. Recent excavations at the site -- part of the Vinca culture which was Europe's biggest prehistoric civilizati

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AP

Humans 164,000 years ago put on primitive makeup and hit the seashore for steaming mussels, new archaeological finds show. A beach party for early man, thrown by people who weren't supposed to be advanced enough for this type of behavior.

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Reuters

French archaeologists have discovered an 11,000-year-old wall painting underground in northern Syria which they believe is the oldest in the world. "We found another painting next to it, but that won't be excavated until next year. It is slo

Anarchapulco June 2024